SYLLABUS: Introduction to Video Production

Kelly Wittenberg, MFA

Assistant Professor of Cinema

CIN 270: Introduction to Video Production

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course introduces the basic technical aspects of digital video production. It is the first production course for Theatre/Cinema majors, and also required for majors in Animation (Art Department), and Convergent Media (Journalism). Students learn hands-on how to use video cameras and non-linear editing software within a project-based approach. Aesthetics, theory, and media literacy are incorporated through lecture and clip examples. Critical thinking is emphasized during critique of student projects. Class size is limited to 15 students. Equipment and Lab Fee.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: Video field production and non-linear post-production comprise the core hands-on activities. Moving picture history, theory, and criticism will also be surveyed in order to develop a context within which to produce and evaluate several video projects.

COURSE OUTCOMES: You will be expected to demonstrate technical proficiency on digital video production equipment and a working knowledge of the Final Cut Pro non-linear editing system. The incorporation of theoretical and aesthetic concepts introduced in class is expected in the realization of your projects. The ability to communicate your new expertise in video production/post-production will be demonstrated by the successful completion of a written exam and active participation in class discussion/critique.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

The Focal Easy Guide to Final Cut Pro X by Rick Young

The Filmmaker’s Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide for the Digital Age (4th Edition) by Steven Ascher and Edward Pincus

REQUIRED MATERIALS: LABEL EVERYTHING WITH YOUR NAME!

External Hard Drive—FIREWIRE—NOT USB

Blank DVD-R for output & class viewing

Miscellaneous supplies as needed per project

GRADING PERCENTAGES:

Assignment #1 – Photographic Sequence: 20%

Assignment #2 – Music Video: 20%

Assignment #3 – Convey the Impossible: 20%

Midterm Exam – Written Exam: 20%

Final Project – Self Portrait: 20%

GRADING STANDARDS: An equal emphasis will be placed on your understanding of the concepts of motion picture aesthetics and criticism introduced in class as well as your technical proficiency and personal effort toward your own creativity. Projects are due as scheduled. Late work is unacceptable. If you are having problems, do not wait until the last minute to ask for help.

A Excellent. Takes problems beyond the assignment to a personal solution, in the form of ambition, creativity, and complexity. Evidence of critical and creative thinking combined with technical skills.

B Good. Goes beyond the assignments but may be deficient in technical skills or imagination.

C Average. Follows assignments and turns them in on time.

D Passing. Deficient. Misses the conceptual or technical level expected.

F Failure. Does not follow instructions, fails to complete assignments.

PROJECTS: There will be an emphasis on the communication of original ideas and personal creativity in the realization of your work for this class. You will be expected to speak thoughtfully about your reasons behind the content you choose for your work.

NO MOVIE TRAILERS

NO VIDEOS ABOUT HANGING OUT IN THE DORM

NO PLAYING WITH GUNS

NO REENACTMENTS OF YOUR FAVORITE GANGSTER OR KUNG FU MOVIE

ATTENDANCE POLICY: Students are expected to attend all class sessions. You will be given an excused absence when acting as an official representative of the university, provided you give prior written verification from the faculty/staff supervisor of the event. Students missing more than 15 minutes of a class session by arriving late or departing early will be considered absent.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: Under all circumstances, students are expected to be honest in their dealings with faculty, administrative staff, and fellow students. In speaking with members of the college community, students must give an accurate representation of the facts at hand. In class assignments, students must submit work that fairly and accurately reflects their level of accomplishment. Any work that is not a product of the student’s own effort is considered dishonest. Students may not submit the same work for more than one class. A student may be suspended or expelled for academic dishonesty. Please refer to the Student Handbook for additional information regarding the policy on academic dishonesty.

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: If you have been diagnosed with a disability or if you suspect that you may have a disability that has never been diagnosed and would like to find out what services may be available, please visit the Office of Disability Services (ODS) in Eder Hall, room 203N or visit the ODS website at http://www.missouriwestern.edu/ds/ as soon as possible. This syllabus, as well as all other printed or electronic materials, can be made available in alternative/accessible formats if requested with sufficient prior notice. Missouri Western is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

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CLASS MEETING READ BEFORE NEXT CLASS PREPARE BEFORE NEXT CLASS
CLASS 1: Introduction. Syllabus. ASSIGNMENT #1 GIVEN: Photographic Sequence. Read Syllabus. Ascher & Pincus: Introduction to Digital & Film Systems (Pages 1-52). PURCHASE BOOKS AND SUPPLIES FOR THIS CLASS. BEGIN ASSIGNMENT #1
CLASS 2: Hands-on Camera Workshop. Capture Card. Manual White Balance. Manual Focus. Ascher & Pincus: Before You Begin Production (Pages 53-101). Handouts: Using a Video Camera  & Tripod AND Camera Manuals.
CLASS 3: Camera Review. Equipment Access Contract. Equipment Loan Policies. Fine System. Ascher & Pincus: The Video Camcorder (Pages 102-140). Handout: Equipment Access Contract & Checklist. COMPLETE ASSIGNMENT #1
CLASS 4: ASSIGNMENT #1: DUE TODAY Photographic Sequence. Viewing/Discussion/Critique. ASSIGNMENT #2 GIVEN: Music Video. Ascher & Pincus: The Lens (Pages 141-184). Young: CH 1 System Setup AND CH 2 The Interface. BRING EXTERNAL HARD DRIVE NEXT CLASS. BEGIN PRE-PRODUCTION FOR ASSIGNMENT #2
CLASS 5: Basic Pre-Production. Configuring your Hard Drive. Log and Transfer. Viewing/Discussion/Critique for Assignment #1 Continued. Ascher & Pincus: The Video Image (Pages 185-252). Young: CH 3 Importing Media. Handout: Basic Pre-Production.
CLASS 6: Lecture on Visual Language. Pattern Elements & Composition. Lenses; Depth of Field; ND Filters. Continuity vs. Montage. Standard Shot Conventions. Young: CH 4 Organization. Handouts: Pattern Elements & Composition AND Glossary of Terms AND Basic Standards for Screen Sizes. SHOOT ASSIGNMENT #2. BRING THESE ITEMS TO NEXT CLASS: FOOTAGE ON EXTERNAL HARD DRIVE & CD AUDIO
CLASS 7: Intro to FINAL CUT PRO. Hands-on editing with required items you bring to class with you. Ascher & Pincus: Editing Digital Video (Pages 544-557). Young: CH 5 Editing. Handout: Final Cut Pro Day 1.
CLASS 8: FINAL CUT PRO Continued. Importing Audio. Making Basic Edits. In Class Work on Assignment #2. Ascher & Pincus: Picture and Dialogue Editing (Pages 521-543). Young: CH 6 Audio.
CLASS 9: FINAL CUT PRO Continued. In Class Work on Assignment #2. Young: CH 7 Effects.
CLASS 10: The Sound/Image Relationship. Experimental Sound Design. FINAL CUT PRO Continued. Output to DVD and Server. ASSIGNMENT #3 GIVEN: Convey the Impossible. In Class Work on Assignment #2. Ascher & Pincus: Sound Recording Techniques (Pages 435-470). Young: CH 8 Share. Handouts: The Sound/Image Relationship AND Output to DVD. BEGIN PRE-PRODUCTION FOR ASSIGNMENT #3
CLASS 11: In Class Work on Assignment #2 or Pre-Production for Assignment #3.   COMPLETE ASSIGNMENT #2
CLASS 12: ASSIGNMENT #2: DUE TODAY Music Video. Viewing/Discussion/Critique.   BEGIN SHOOTING ASSIGNMENT #3
CLASS 13: Review for Midterm. Viewing/Discussion/Critique for Assignment #2 Continued. Handout: Midterm Review. STUDY FOR EXAM
CLASS 14: MIDTERM EXAM. Viewing/Discussion/Critique for Assignment #2 Continued or In Class Work on Assignment #3.  
CLASS 15: In Class Work on Assignment #3.  
CLASS 16: Film Screening: TBA.  
CLASS 17: In Class Work on Assignment #3.  
CLASS 18: FINAL ASSIGNMENT GIVEN: Self Portrait. In Class Work on Assignment #3.   BEGIN WORK ON FINAL
CLASS 19: In Class Work on Assignment #3.   COMPLETE ASSIGNMENT #3
CLASS 20: ASSIGNMENT #3: DUE TODAY Convey the Impossible. Viewing/Discussion/Critique.  
CLASS 21: Viewing/Discussion/Critique for Assignment #3 Continued.  
CLASS 22: Viewing/Discussion/Critique for Assignment #3 Continued or In Class Work on FINAL.  
CLASS 23: In Class Work on FINAL.  
CLASS 24: Film Screening: TBA.  
CLASS 25: In Class Work on FINAL.  
CLASS 26: In Class Work on FINAL.  
CLASS 27: In Class Work on FINAL.   COMPLETE FINAL ASSIGNMENT
CLASS 28: FINAL ASSIGNMENT: DUE TODAY. Viewing/Discussion/Critique.  
CLASS 29: Viewing/Discussion/Critique for FINAL Continued.  

SYLLABUS: Film Theory & Criticism

Kelly Wittenberg, MFA

Assistant Professor of Cinema

CIN 285: Film Theory & Criticism

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Examination of various approaches to film theory and criticism including formal aspects of cinema, tools for stylistic analysis, and ideological implications of film.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: In this course, students will explore more than a century of classic thought and writing about film. Readings from pioneers in film theory–including Eisenstein, Arnheim, Kracauer, and Bazin–combined with contemporary scholarly thought will provide a broad survey of both historical and theoretical viewpoints on the subject. Students will learn to develop critical thinking skills through written assignments that combine readings from film theory with a new understanding of visual language.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

Doing Film Studies: A Subject Guide for Students by Sarah Casey Benyahia and Claire Mortimer

The Major Film Theories: An Introduction by J. Dudley Andrew

Handouts (paper or online) as assigned

REQUIRED MATERIALS:

Spiral Bound Notebook Clearly Labeled with Your Name

GRADING PERCENTAGES:

Attitude, Attendance and Participation: 10%

Written Film Notes: 20%

Midterm Presentation: 30%

Written Essay Final: 40%

GRADING STANDARDS: Assignments are due as scheduled. Late work is unacceptable. If you are having problems, do not wait until the last minute to ask for help.

A Excellent. Takes problems beyond the assignment to a personal solution, in the form of ambition, creativity, and complexity. Evidence of critical and creative thinking combined with technical skills.

B Good. Goes beyond the assignments but may be deficient in technical skills or imagination.

C Average. Follows assignments and turns them in on time.

D Passing. Deficient. Misses the conceptual or technical level expected.

F Failure. Does not follow instructions, fails to complete assignments.

ATTENDANCE POLICY: Students are expected to attend all class sessions. You will be given an excused absence when acting as an official representative of the university, provided you give prior written verification from the faculty/staff supervisor of the event. Students missing more than 15 minutes of a class session by arriving late or departing early will be considered absent.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: Under all circumstances, students are expected to be honest in their dealings with faculty, administrative staff, and fellow students. In speaking with members of the college community, students must give an accurate representation of the facts at hand. In class assignments, students must submit work that fairly and accurately reflects their level of accomplishment. Any work that is not a product of the student’s own effort is considered dishonest. Students may not submit the same work for more than one class. A student may be suspended or expelled for academic dishonesty. Please refer to the Student Handbook for additional information regarding the policy on academic dishonesty.

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: If you have been diagnosed with a disability or if you suspect that you may have a disability that has never been diagnosed and would like to find out what services may be available, please visit the Office of Disability Services (ODS) in Eder Hall, room 203N or visit the ODS website at http://www.missouriwestern.edu/ds/ as soon as possible. This syllabus, as well as all other printed or electronic materials, can be made available in alternative/accessible formats if requested with sufficient prior notice. Missouri Western is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

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C L A S S   M E E T I N G R E A D   B E F O R E   N E X T   C L A S S
CLASS 1: Introduction. Syllabus. Structure of Course. Screening: Donnie Darko (R) dir. Richard Kelly. (2001); 113 mins. Assignment #1 Given: Film Theorist Presentation. Andrew: Introduction (pages 3-10). Benyahia/Mortimer: Introduction & Part I: What We Watch and What We Study (pages ix-9). Handouts: "It's Just a Movie: A Teaching Essay for Introductory Media Classes" by Greg M. Smith. Quote from The Philosophy of Literary Form by Kenneth Burke.
CLASS 2: Spiral Notebook Check. Discussion of Film and Reading. Lecture/Demonstration: Library Search for Journal Articles & How to Use Interlibrary Loan. Trip to Library to begin research for presentation. Andrew: The Formative Tradition & Hugo Munsterberg (pages 11-26). Benyahia/Mortimer: Part II: The History of Film Studies (pages 13-63). Handouts: "Some Suggestions on How to Read a Film" by Michael Goldberg. "Film Theory and Approaches to Criticism or What did that movie mean?" by Christopher P. Jacobs. "Where is Donnie? Dreams and Delusions in Donnie Darko" by Jessica Raschke. "Where's Donnie? It's Neither Here Nor There: Ideas for Teaching Donnie Darko" by Gary Simmons.
CLASS 3: Discussion of Reading. Screening: Badlands (PG) dir. Terrence Malick. (1973); 94 mins. Andrew: Rudolf Arnheim (pages 27-41). Benyahia/Mortimer: Part III: Studying the Film Text (pages 67-104). Handouts: "How to Watch: Developing Memory and Taking Notes" by David Bordwell. "Badlands: Review" by William Johnson.
CLASS 4: Discussion of Film and Reading. Screening: Platoon (R) dir. Oliver Stone. (1986); 120 mins. Andrew: Sergei Eisenstein (pages 42-75). Benyahia/Mortimer: Part IV: Film as a Contemporary Discipline (pages 107-149). Handout: "The Christian Allegorical Structure of Platoon" by Avent Beck.
CLASS 5: Discussion of Film and Reading. Spiral Notebooks DUE. Library Trip for In-Class Work. Individual help as needed for presentation. Andrew: Béla Balázs and the Tradition of Formalism (pages 76-101).
CLASS 6: Discussion of Reading. Screening: 3:10 to Yuma (R) dir. James Mangold. (2007); 122 mins. Andrew: Realist film Theory & Siegfried Kracauer (pages 103-133). Handout: "Masculinity in 3:10 to Yuma" by Carol A. MacCurdy.
CLASS 7: Student Presentations DUE TODAY Group 1: Hugo Munsterberg. Group 2: Rudolf Arnheim. Group 3: Sergei Eisenstein. Group 4: Béla Balázs. Andrew: André Bazin (pages 134-178).
CLASS 8: Student Presentations DUE TODAY (cont.) Group 5: Siegfried Kracauer. Group 6: André Bazin. Group 7: Jean Mitry. Group 8: Christian Metz. Andrew: Contemporary French Film Theory & Jean Mitry (pages 179-211).
CLASS 9: Discussion of Reading. Screening: Boys Don't Cry (R) dir. Kimberly Peirce. (1999); 118 mins. Assignment #2 Given: Written Essay—5-page research paper combining your film theorist plus one film screened in this class. Andrew: Christian Metz and the Semiology of the Cinema (pages 212-241). Handouts: "Appropriating Identity" by Mira Hird. "Boys Don't Cry – A Movie Review: Implications for Counseling Persons Who Are Transgendered" by Jinnelle Veronique Aguilar. "The Analytical Essay" by David Bordwell. "Read This Before Writing Your Paper." "Film Theory" Sparknotes.
CLASS 10: Discussion of Film and Reading. Screening: Thelma and Louise (R) dir. Ridley Scott. (1991); 130 mins. Andrew: The Challenge of Phenomenology: Amédée Ayfre and Henri Agel (pages 242-253). Handouts: "Gender Genre and Myth in Thelma and Louise" by Glenn Man. "Thelma and Louise" by Richard Schickel.
CLASS 11: Discussion of Film and Reading. Screening: The Help (PG-13) dir. Tate Taylor. (2011); 146 mins. Handouts: "The Oppositional Gaze" by bell hooks. "An Open Statement to the Fans of The Help" by Ida E. Jones; Daima Ramey Berry; Tiffany M. Gill; Kali Nicole Gross; and Janice Sumler-Edmond. "The Solace of Preparing Fried Foods and Other Quaint Remembrances from 1960's Mississippi: Thoughts on The Help" by Roxane Gay.
CLASS 12: Discussion of Film and Reading. Screening: Miss Representation (NR) dir. Jennifer Siebel Newsom. (2011); 88 mins. Handout: "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema" by Laura Mulvey.
CLASS 13: Discussion of Film and Reading. Screening: Grizzly Man (R) dir. Werner Herzog. (2005); 103 mins. Handout: "Grizzly Ghost: Herzog Bazin and the Cinematic Animal" by Seung-Hoon Jeong and Dudley Andrew.
CLASS 14: WRITTEN ESSAY DUE TODAY. Spiral Notebooks DUE. Discussion of Film and Reading. Screening: I Heart Huckabees (R) dir. David O. Russell. (2004); 107 mins. Handouts: "Hearts and Minds" by Gavin Smith. "How am I Not Myself: Philosophical Despair in I Heart Huckabees" by Tadd Ruetenik.
CLASS 15: FINAL Return of Graded Papers. Return of Notebooks. Screening: Sex Lies and Videotape (R) dir. Steven Soderbergh. (1989); 100 mins. Handout: "Sex Lies and Marketing: Miramax and the Development of the Quality Indie Blockbuster" by Alisa Perren.

SYLLABUS: Scriptwriting

Kelly Wittenberg, MFA

Assistant Professor of Cinema

CIN 360: Scriptwriting

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Through the practice of screenwriting, students will learn how to represent in words not only story, but also sound design, editing, visual design, and other parameters of media making. Students will discover how core narrative concepts of character, structure, plot, theme and tone interact within existing and emerging media and explore how to utilize these concepts to express their personal vision, creativity, and voice.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: This course is designed to supply students with the tools to expand and enrich their appreciation of all aspects of filmmaking and screenwriting in particular. Students will fine-tune the ability to both provide and receive constructive criticism within a supportive atmosphere of collaboration.

COURSE OUTCOMES: Students gain a working knowledge of professional screenplay format through practical work toward the ability to translate one’s visual ideas into written form. Through a structured process of writing and revision, students will complete an original eight to twelve page short script suitable for use as a production project and/or entry into screenplay competitions.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

Writing Short Films (2nd Edition) by Linda J. Cowgill

The Screenwriter’s Bible: A Complete Guide to Writing, Formatting, and Selling Your Script (5th Edition) by David Trottier

SUGGESTED TEXTS: 

How Not to Make a Short Film: Secrets From a Sundance Programmer by Roberta Monroe

Swimming Upstream: A Lifesaving Guide to Short Film Distribution by Sharon Badal

REQUIRED MATERIALS: 

External Hard Drive or other device to save and protect your work

Access to Printer prior to scheduled class time

Printer Paper to print your written work

COPIES of each draft of your script for students to use for table readings during class

REQUIRED SOFTWARE:         

FINAL DRAFT, CELTX, or similar screenwriting program

GRADING PERCENTAGES:

Class Participation: 25%

Writing Exercises: 25%

Final Draft of Screenplay: 40%

Final Draft of Premise (Log Line) and Synopsis: 10%

GRADING STANDARDS: An equal emphasis will be placed on your understanding of the concepts of motion picture aesthetics and criticism introduced in class as well as your technical proficiency and personal effort toward your own creativity. Projects are due as scheduled. Late work is unacceptable. If you are having problems, do not wait until the last minute to ask for help.

A Excellent. Takes problems beyond the assignment to a personal solution, in the form of ambition, creativity, and complexity. Evidence of critical and creative thinking combined with technical skills.

B Good. Goes beyond the assignments but may be deficient in technical skills or imagination.

C Average. Follows assignments and turns them in on time.

D Passing. Deficient. Misses the conceptual or technical level expected.

F Failure. Does not follow instructions, fails to complete assignments.

CLASS PARTICIPATION: Class discussion and script workshop are a significant portion of the learning experience and your grade. Active participation includes reading the textbook assignments and handouts as shown in the syllabus prior to class discussion. Coming to class on time with the required materials (ex. enough copies of your script for everyone in the class), turning in assignments on time in the correct format, and active listening to your classmates’ work when it is presented in workshop, are expected. Active listening during presentation of your classmates’ work is demonstrated by your ability to critique the work courteously with comments that are relevant to the material. Making jokes or sarcastic comments to garner attention or get a quick laugh will be considered destructive to the collaborative environment and will not be tolerated. Active participation in workshop includes expanding your own ability to receive constructive criticism with a mind open to revisions. Failure to attend class on a day you are scheduled for workshop, and/or avoiding active consideration of suggested revisions to your work will result in a deduction of up to one full grade for overall class participation.

PROJECTS: There will be an emphasis on the communication of original ideas and personal creativity in the realization of your work for this class. You will be expected to speak thoughtfully about your reasons behind the content you choose for your work.

ATTENDANCE POLICY: Students are expected to attend all class sessions. You will be given an excused absence when acting as an official representative of the university, provided you give prior written verification from the faculty/staff supervisor of the event. Students missing more than 15 minutes of a class session by arriving late or departing early will be considered absent.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: Under all circumstances, students are expected to be honest in their dealings with faculty, administrative staff, and fellow students. In speaking with members of the college community, students must give an accurate representation of the facts at hand. In class assignments, students must submit work that fairly and accurately reflects their level of accomplishment. Any work that is not a product of the student’s own effort is considered dishonest. Students may not submit the same work for more than one class. A student may be suspended or expelled for academic dishonesty. Please refer to the Student Handbook for additional information regarding the policy on academic dishonesty.

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: If you have been diagnosed with a disability or if you suspect that you may have a disability that has never been diagnosed and would like to find out what services may be available, please visit the Office of Disability Services (ODS) in Eder Hall, room 203N or visit the ODS website at http://www.missouriwestern.edu/ds/ as soon as possible. This syllabus, as well as all other printed or electronic materials, can be made available in alternative/accessible formats if requested with sufficient prior notice. Missouri Western is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

C  O  U  R  S  E      S  C  H  E  D  U  L  E

C L A S S   M E E T I N G R E A D   B E F O R E   N E X T   C L A S S
CLASS 1: Introduction. Syllabus. Structure of this course. Lecture/Discussion: What is a short film? Screening: Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story (NR) dir. Todd Haynes. (1987); 43 mins. ASSIGNMENT #1 GIVEN: Begin thinking about your script for this class. List ten (10) possible ideas each typed in one sentence. DUE CLASS 3. Cowgill: Introduction & Before We Start–The Principles of Drama (pages xi-12). Handout: "Keep it Fresh" from How Not to Make a Short Film: Secrets from a Sundance Programmer by Roberta Monroe. "From Underground to Multiplex: An Interview with Todd Haynes" by Scott MacDonald.
CLASS 2: Introduction to Narrative structure. ASSIGNMENT #2 GIVEN: Search for popular screenplays online and complete Handout. DUE CLASS 4. Cowgill: Starting Out–What's It About (pages 13-33). Handout: Questions about your favorite screenplay.
CLASS 3: TEN IDEAS DUE TODAY Workshop. ASSIGNMENT #3 GIVEN: In light of today's discussion–revise modify or choose one of your ten ideas and create your PITCH. It should be typed in at least one sentence–but not more than three sentences–and it should contain your PREMISE. DUE CLASS 5. Cowgill: Character & Emotion–Who Does What and Why (pages 34-63).
CLASS 4: SCREENPLAY HANDOUT DUE TODAY Group Discussion on Narrative structure. Cowgill: The Three-Part Nature of Film Structure (pages 64-82).
CLASS 5: TYPED PITCH DUE TODAY Workshop. ASSIGNMENT #4 GIVEN: In light of today's discussion–revise modify or elaborate upon your Pitch to create a TREATMENT for your script. DUE CLASS 8. Cowgill: Plotting–The Twists & Turns (83-99).
CLASS 6: Lecture: Show vs. Tell – Part I. Screenings: La Jetée (NR) dir. Chris Marker. (1962); 28 mins. Un Chien Andalou (NR) dir. Luis Buñuel & Salvador Dalí. (1929); 16 mins. Cowgill: Fade In: Openings & The Main Exposition (pages 103-120).
CLASS 7: Lecture: Show vs. Tell – Part II. Screening: Les Quatre Cents Coups (The 400 Blows) (NR) dir. François Truffaut. (1959); 99 mins. Cowgill: The Middle–Keeping the Story Alive (pages 121-132).
CLASS 8: TREATMENT DUE TODAY Workshop. COMPLETE ALL REVISIONS AS ASSIGNED. ASSIGNMENT #5 GIVEN: Upon approval of your Treatment write a SCENE OUTLINE for your script. DUE CLASS 11. Cowgill: Fade Out–Revelation Climax & Resolution (pages 133-146).
CLASS 9: TREATMENT Workshop (Continued). Presentation of revised pages. COMPLETE ALL REVISIONS AS ASSIGNED. Cowgill: Constructing the Scene (pages 149-164).
CLASS 10: Lecture: Shooting Script vs. Spec Script. TREATMENT Workshop (Continued). Presentation of revised pages. COMPLETE ALL REVISIONS AS ASSIGNED. Cowgill: Dialogue: The Search for the Perfect Line (pages 165-177). Handout: Basic Screen Sizes and Glossary.
CLASS 11: SCENE OUTLINE DUE TODAY Workshop. COMPLETE ALL REVISIONS AS ASSIGNED. ASSIGNMENT #6 GIVEN: Upon approval of your Scene Outline begin writing your SHOOTING SCRIPT. DUE CLASS 15. Cowgill: The Subtext of Meaning (pages 178-188).
CLASS 12: SCENE OUTLINE Workshop (Continued). Presentation of revised pages. COMPLETE ALL REVISIONS AS ASSIGNED. Cowgill: Keeping Focused: What Does My Protagonist Really Want? (pages 191-195). Handout: Sample Script Page.
CLASS 13: Introduction to screenwriting software. In Class Work on your script using Final Draft. Handout: Proper Script Format.
CLASS 14: In Class Work on your script using Final Draft. Trottier: Book I: How to Write a Screenplay–A Primer (pages 3-95).
CLASS 15: FIRST DRAFT SHOOTING SCRIPT DUE TODAY Workshop. COMPLETE ALL REVISIONS AS ASSIGNED. ASSIGNMENT #7 GIVEN: Upon approval of your First Draft begin writing SECOND DRAFT. DUE CLASS 20.
CLASS 16: FIRST DRAFT Workshop (Continued). Presentation of revised pages. COMPLETE ALL REVISIONS AS ASSIGNED. Trottier: Book II: 7 Steps to a Stunning Script–A Workbook (pages 99-126).
CLASS 17: MIDTERM. FIRST DRAFT Workshop (Continued). Presentation of revised pages. COMPLETE ALL REVISIONS AS ASSIGNED.
CLASS 18: FIRST DRAFT Workshop (Continued). Presentation of revised pages. COMPLETE ALL REVISIONS AS ASSIGNED. Trottier: Book III: Proper Formatting Technique–A Style Guide (pages 129-215).
CLASS 19: Screening: Frances Ha (R) dir. Noah Baumbach. (2012); 86 mins. Handout: "Deconstructing Frances."
CLASS 20: SECOND DRAFT SCRIPT DUE TODAY Workshop. COMPLETE ALL REVISIONS AS ASSIGNED. ASSIGNMENT #8 GIVEN: Upon approval of your Second Draft begin writing FINAL SPEC SCRIPT. DUE CLASS 25. Trottier: Book IV: Writing & Revising Your Breakthrough Script–A Script Consultant's View (pages 219-278).
CLASS 21: SECOND DRAFT Workshop (Continued). Presentation of revised pages. COMPLETE ALL REVISIONS AS ASSIGNED.
CLASS 22: SECOND DRAFT Workshop (Continued). Presentation of revised pages. COMPLETE ALL REVISIONS AS ASSIGNED.
CLASS 23: SECOND DRAFT Workshop (Continued). Presentation of revised pages. COMPLETE ALL REVISIONS AS ASSIGNED.
CLASS 24: Screening: Elephant (R) dir. Gus Van Sant. (2003); 81 mins. Handout: "Elephant" by Sophie Moore.
CLASS 25: FINAL SPEC SCRIPT DUE TODAY Workshop. COMPLETE ALL REVISIONS AS ASSIGNED. FINAL ASSIGNMENT GIVEN: Upon approval of the Final Spec Version of your script begin drafting a SYNOPSIS & LOGLINE. DUE CLASS 28. Handout: "Swimtest: The Workbook" from Swimming Upstream: A Lifesaving Guide to Short Film Distribution by Sharon Badal.
CLASS 26: FINAL SPEC SCRIPT Workshop (Continued). Presentation of revised pages. COMPLETE ALL REVISIONS AS ASSIGNED.
CLASS 27: FINAL SPEC SCRIPT Workshop (Continued). Presentation of revised pages. COMPLETE ALL REVISIONS AS ASSIGNED.
CLASS 28: FINAL SPEC SCRIPT with SYNOPSIS & LOGLINE DUE TODAY. Screening: Upstream Color (NR) dir. Shane Carruth. (2013); 96 mins. Handout: "Puzzled" by Brian Rafferty.
CLASS 29: FINAL–SCRIPTS RETURNED WITH COMMENTS. Screening: Short Film TBA

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